Appendix I

         4-27-04

THE FOLLOWING SENATORS SIGNED THE ROSTER AT THE

TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2004 SENATE MEETING

Alcock, James

Browning, Barton

Curran, Brian

Althouse, P. Richard

Brunsden, Victor

Curtis, Wayne

Ansari, Mohamad

Burgess, Robert

Das, Rishi

Arnold, Judd

Cameron, Craig

Davis, Dwight

Atwater, Deborah

Cancro, John

De Jong, Gordon

Baggett, Connie

Cardamone, Michael

DeCastro, W. Travis

Barbato, Guy

Carpenter, Lynn

Deines, Peter

Barnes, David

Casteel, Mark

Disney, Diane

Barshinger, Richard

Catchen, Gary

Donovan, James

Becker, Paul

Cecere, Joseph

DuPont-Morales, M.

Benson, Thomas

Cheney, Debora

Eckhardt, Caroline

Berkowitz, Leonard

Chorney, Michael

Egolf, Roger

Bise, Christopher

Chu, Chao-Hsien

Elder, James

Bittner, Edward

Clark, Paul

Ellis, Bill

Blumberg, Melvin

Clark-Evans, Christine

Engelder, Terry

Breakey, Laurie

Coraor, Lee

Erickson, Rodney

Bridges, K. Robert

Corbets, Jeffrey

Eslinger, Paul

Brinker, Dan

Costantino, Roselyn

Esposito, Jacqueline

Brown, Douglas

Cox-Foster, Diana

Evensen, Dorothy

Browne, Stephen


Cranage, David


Falzone, Christopher


Farmer, Edgar

Hellmann, John

Lee, Sukyoung

 

Fernandez-Jimenez, Juan

High, Kane

Love, Nancy

 

Floros, Joanna

Hilton, James

Lynch, Christopher

 

Fosmire, Gary

Holcomb, E. Jay

MacCarthy, Stephen

 

Franz, George

Holen, Dale

Malloy, Robert

 

Gates, Zachary

Horwitz, Alan

Mara, Cynthia

 

Georgopulos, Peter

Hufnagel, Pamela

Marshall, J. Daniel

 

Glumac, Thomas

Hupcey, Judith

Marsico, Salvatore

 

Goldstein, Lynda

Hutchinson, Susan

Mason, John

 

Gonzalez-Perez, Anibal

Irwin, Zachary

Mattila, Anna

 

Gorby, Christine

Jacobs, Janis

Maxwell, Kevin

 

Gouran, Dennis

Jago, Deidre

May, James

 

Gray, Timothy

Johnson, Ernest

McCarty, Ronald

 

Green, David

Jonson, Michael

McCorkle, Sallie

 

Hagen, Daniel

Jurs, Peter

Mengisteab, Kidane

 

Hanes, Madlyn

Kane, Eileen

Moore, John

 

Hanley, Elizabeth

Keefe, Matthew

Moses, Wilson

 

Hannan, John

Khalilollahi, Amir

Mueller, Alfred

 

Harmonosky, Catherine

Koul, Ravinder

Myers, Jamie

 

Heinsohn, Robert


Le, Binh


Oliver, Mary


 

Osagie, Iyunolu

Schengrund, Cara-Lynne

Steiner, Kim

Pangborn, Robert

Schmiedekamp, Ann

Sternad, Dagmar

Pauley, Laura

Schwartz, Erica

Strauss, James

Pauley, Laura

Secor, Robert

Su, Mila

Pell, Eva

Selzer, John

Szczygiel, Bonj

Petriello, Gene

Semali, Ladislaus

Tachibana, Reiko

Ray, Gautam

Shea, Dennis

Thomchick, Evelyn

Rebane, P. Peter

Simmonds, Patience

Tikalsky, Paul

Richards, Winston

Simons, Richard

Tormey, Brian

Ricketts, Robert

Simpson, Timothy

Troester, Rodney

Rishel, Tammy

Singh, Harjit

Turner, Tramble

Romano, John

Smith, James

Urenko, John

Romberger, Andrew

Smith, Stephen

Vandiver, Beverly

Ropson, Ira

Smith, Carol

Vgontzas, Alexandros

Roth, Gregory

Smith, Edward

Vickers, Anita

Russell, David

Sommese, Kristin

Wade, Richard

Sachs, Howard

Soto, Lourdes

Wager, J. James

Sathianathan, Dhushy

Spanier, Graham

Wagner, Kristy

Scaroni, Alan

Spigelman, Candace

Walters, Robert

Schaeffer, Stephen

Spychalski, John

Welch, Susan







Wheeler, Eileen

Wiens-Tuers, Barbara

Wijekumar, Kay

Willits, Billie

Wilson, Matthew

Wyatt, Nancy

Yahner, Richard

Yoder, Edgar

Zervanos, Stamatis

 

 

 

               Total Elected:          169

          Total Ex Officio:              5

          Total Appointed:               7

TOTAL ATTENDING:          181

 


Appendix II
4-27-04

DOOR HANDOUT

Revisions to the Proposal for Revising the Intercultural/International

Competence Requirement

 

 

1.  Page 7.  Paragraph 2. 

 

Revise to read as follows:

 

A course that fulfills the United States Cultures requirement must strive to increase students’ understanding of contemporary United States society.  Such course need not focus exclusively on the present and may concern a historical subject.

 

 

2.  Page 9, #2 Other Existing Courses.  Line 6.  Revise the sentence that begins:  “For courses taught at multiple…” to read:

 

“For offerings of the same course at multiple locations, the college offering the course will determine the designation.”

 

 

3.  Pages 8 and 9.  Add the following sentence to the last line of #s 1, 2, 3, and 6:

 

“The following process will be used:  The Senate will ask each Associate Dean for Resident Instruction to send the University Curriculum Coordinator a list of those courses that qualify for the United States Cultures or the International Cultures designation.  The Associate Dean for Resident Instruction will send a request to each department or division head to determine the proper designation for each course that qualifies.  The head will send the department’s response to the Associate Dean for Resident Instruction who will convey that information to the University Curriculum Coordinator.”


Appendix III

4-27-04

 

Corrected Copy


Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs

SENATE committee on Undergraduate Education

 

Proposal for Revising the Intercultural/International Competence Requirement

 

(Legislative)

Implementation: Summer 2005 upon Approval by the President

 

Introduction

 

In response to the 1997 Senate General Education legislation that called for the continuous review of each component of the requirements, the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Education in September 2002 formed a subcommittee to review the current Intercultural/ International Competence Requirement (GI).  Membership on the subcommittee included representatives from Undergraduate Education, Curricular Affairs, Gye N’Yame, Undergraduate Student Government, and the departments of African and African-American Studies, Music, Religious Studies, and Women’s Studies.  The subcommittee consisted of the following members:  Cheryl L. Achterberg, Major C. Coleman, Michael J. Johnson, Nakeia L. Oliver, Judith Ozment Payne, William L. Petersen, David W. Russell, Julia B. Simon, Chair, D. Joshua Troxell, Eric R.White, and M. Daniel Yoder.  The charge to the subcommittee asked that it “review and clarify the current description of GI.”  The charge further indicated that “guidelines and criteria must be written to give clear guidance to departments submitting a GI proposal and to the Committee reviewing the GI proposals.” 

 

In November 2003, the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Education formulated a preliminary report based on the work of the 2002-2003 subcommittee, discussions within the parent committee, and consultation with the Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs.

 

In December 2003, Christopher J. Bise, Chair of the University Faculty Senate, formed a Conference Committee composed of members of the Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs and members of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Education so that the two committees could work together to bring to completion their review of the GI requirement.  Chair Bise charged this special committee to recommend whatever changes to the GI requirement the Conference Committee deemed necessary. In addition, he directed the committee to consider the original purpose of this requirement.  In early March, the Conference Committee submitted its report and recommendations to the Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs and to the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Education.  On March 16, 2004, both committees approved the report.

 

History of the GI Requirement

 

The history of the GI requirement is relevant for understanding the current recommendations. 

 

1990 legislation, revised in 1994.  On March 20, 1990, the University Faculty Senate established a Cultural Diversity graduation requirement.  Baccalaureate degree students were required to take either 3 credits in Diversity Focused (DF) courses or 12 credits in Diversity Enhanced (DE) courses.  Subsequently, on April 26, 1994, the Diversity Enhanced option was eliminated so that the requirement consisted of 3 Diversity Focused credits.

 

According to the 1990 Guide to Curricular Procedures, “the goal of Cultural Diversity courses is to encourage students through their studies in many disciplines to (a) consider the various historical backgrounds, cultural and scientific contributions, economic, psychological, and political situations of a wide range of other peoples; and (b) appreciate the impact of the developing global community on American Society.” (SR: 3/20/90 – quoted in the Guide to Curricular Procedures, Section 1, Item G).

 

“Cultural Diversity” was specifically defined as, “(1) a focus on the study of groups whose experiences and culture are underrepresented in the curriculum; such groups include those distinguished by characteristics related to ethnicity, race, religion, gender, physical/mental disability, and/or sexual orientation; or (2) a focus on the development of a global perspective through study of the impact of other countries and their peoples on society” (Guide to Curricular Procedures, Spring 1996).

 

1997 legislation (current legislation).  As part of the University-wide reconsideration of General Education enacted during the 1997-1998 academic year, Senate legislation of December 2, 1997 replaced the “Cultural Diversity Requirement” with the current “Intercultural and International Competence Requirement” (GI).   The requirement remained at 3 credits.  As before, a range of courses in various knowledge domains could carry the GI (formerly Diversity) designation.  One of the objectives of the GI requirement was “to emphasize student engagement and active learning.”  (Senate Agenda, December 2, 1997, Final Report and Recommendations of the Special Committee on General Education, p. 21.)

 

Current GI Legislation

 

The following legislation is now in effect:

 

 “The SCGE [Special Committee on General Education] actually makes two recommendations in relation to the intercultural and international competence component of general education.  The first is to include this competence in the list of elements that can be selected for integration into all the domain knowledge-based courses (Recommendation #4).  The second, outlined here, is to refine the focus of the current cultural diversity requirement.  There are several factors to this:

 

  1. To retain the 3-credit cultural diversity requirement for both baccalaureate and associate degree candidates—but to rename it the Intercultural and International Competence component—and establish it as an integral part of the general education program, rather than as an add-on;
  2. To sharpen its focus by developing guidelines for approval of diversity-focused courses or experiences (study abroad, in-service work, etc.) that pertain to what students come to know and also learn to do;
  3. To place an emphasis on active student involvement in the learning process and to encourage students to take these courses early in their academic experience;
  4. To assess the impact of these courses through students’ or graduates’ perspectives on the influence the courses had on their attitudes, behavior or academic choices.”

                       

Senate Agenda December 2, 1997, Final Report and Recommendations of the Special Senate Committee on General Education, p. 22.

 

Since 1997, as part of the University-wide process of General Education course recertifications, 580 courses have either been recertified as GI (these were courses that had formerly had the Cultural Diversity designation), or newly certified as GI (these were courses, including courses newly added to the curriculum, that had not formerly had the Cultural Diversity designation).

 

Justification for Changes

 

For the reasons detailed in the recommendations below, we propose that the Senate replace the Intercultural/International Competence (GI) General Education requirement with two separate requirements, one that focuses on United States Cultures and another that focuses on International Cultures.

 

  1. The revised requirements will provide our students with a better education by ensuring that students have both United States and international coursework.

 

The 1997 legislation that established the Intercultural/International Competence requirement saw a clear value in studying both topics, but at the time the committee could not find a way of incorporating both within the General Education framework. Events of the past few years, including 9/11 and the student concerns expressed during the Village meetings of April 2001, indicated that both were important to our students and that both had to find a place within our program of study.  The either/or arrangement was no longer what we needed.

 

For that reason, the committees that have recently examined the GI issue have concluded that it was necessary to do what the 1997 Task Force also desired:  to incorporate within our requirements a knowledge of both United States cultures and of international cultures.   For that reason, we are proposing one requirement called United States Cultures and another called International Cultures (3 credits each).

 

  1. The titles of the revised requirements will be more readily understandable than the current requirement that is entitled Intercultural/International Competence.

 

(a)  The term Intercultural/International has created some confusion since the requirement was adopted.  The term United States Cultures states clearly that a course in that category will deal with cultural issues within the United States.  The term International Cultures states clearly that the course will deal with cultural issues in nations other than the United States.

 

(b)  The term Competence has also created some misunderstanding.  We do not claim that one course, or two, will make students competent, or that we can measure such competence. The proposal has replaced that term with the word knowledge. 

 

  1. The revised requirements will allow students to choose from a richer array of courses.

 

As a result of the changes detailed in the recommendation below, students will be able to choose from a wider number of courses to fulfill the United States Cultures and the International Cultures requirements.

 

(a)   All courses currently identified as GI will satisfy the revised requirements. Curricular Affairs will give these existing courses one or both of the new designations via a streamlined redesignation process.

 

(b)   Departments offering General Education Skills courses that are not now included in GI will be encouraged to designate a limited number of sections in which at least 25% of the material satisfies one or the other requirement. For example, several specific sections of English 15 or English 30 could be so identified, as well as sections of CAS 100.  Such sections of skills courses will be taught primarily by faculty or by specially trained instructors.  This option will be primarily useful for those locations where it may be hard to meet the requirement by way of Knowledge Domain courses.  It will also be helpful to students in certain highly-structured degree programs.

 

(c)   Additional courses at any level may be proposed by their academic units and approved by Senate procedures as either United States Cultures or International Cultures. Departments that now offer 400 level courses in one or both of these areas will be encouraged to submit those courses for designation.

 

(d)   The strategies above will encourage departments to make available more courses that will satisfy the United States Cultures or the International Cultures requirement.  Strategies for making adequate spaces in such courses available to students at all locations, without a major increase in instructional costs, include expanded use of Campus Course Exchange or World Campus offerings, greater use of advising networks to make sure that available seats are filled and that students are aware of all options, and consultation with individual departments in the scheduling process.

 

Feasibility

 

These revised requirements are not only educationally desirable but also feasible.

Because it is anticipated that these requirements can be double-counted within the range of existing requirements, they will not necessarily increase the number of credits needed to graduate.

 

Just as students currently fulfill the Intercultural/International Competence requirement by double-counting it with a General Education Knowledge Domain course or with a course in their major or with Study Abroad etc., so students may fulfill the revised requirements by double-counting both the United States Cultures and the International Cultures courses if permitted by their college, major, or degree program.  To make it easier for students to find courses to fulfill these requirements, as noted above the pool of courses or sections to be made available for such double-counting should be greatly increased.

 

This proposal does not preclude colleges, majors, or degree programs from requiring more specific course work in United States Cultures or International Cultures, just as academic programs can now require further course work in any other category of General Education and often do.

 

We should think of the revised requirements as a way of fulfilling existing components of the baccalaureate degree.

 

1.   For many, indeed perhaps nearly all, students, the courses used to fulfill both requirements may be double-counted with special sections of required Skills courses, Knowledge Domain courses, and courses within the major or minor.

 

2.      In addition, approved courses taken as electives, internships, individual study, Study Abroad, Peace Corps, Americorps, Teach America, and first-year seminars, etc. may also be used to fulfill the United States Cultures or International Cultures requirements.

 

3.      Appropriate courses at all levels will count.  The rule precluding students from using courses in their major to fulfill General Education requirements will not apply to courses used to fulfill either of these two requirements. This situation will be the same as now exists for W courses or First-Year Seminars, where courses in the student’s major may be used to fill these requirements.

 

4.      A few examples of student choices follow.  In all cases, overlap with another requirement occurs, so that additional credits are not needed:

 

a.  A student majoring in Psychology uses a First-Year Seminar within the College of the Liberal Arts to meet a United States Cultures requirement and, simultaneously, a General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement.

 

b.  A student majoring in Biology uses Sociology 119:  Race and Ethnic Relations to meet a United States Cultures requirement and simultaneously a General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement.

 

c.  A student majoring in Spanish or Japanese uses a 400-level Spanish or Japanese culture course, within the major, to meet the International Cultures requirement and simultaneously a major requirement

 

d.  A student majoring in Chemical Engineering uses English 139:  Black American Writers to meet a United States Cultures requirement and simultaneously a General Education Humanities requirement.

 

e.  A student beginning her education at Hazelton and majoring in HDFS, uses History 121:  History of the Holocaust to fulfill the International Cultures requirement and simultaneously a General Education Humanities requirement.

 

f.   A student majoring in Comparative Literature uses an Education Abroad semester in Germany to meet the International Cultures requirement and simultaneously to meet requirements for a minor in German.

 

g.  A student majoring in Secondary Education uses a semester-long internship in an inner-city school district to fulfill a United States Cultures requirement and simultaneously fulfill electives within her degree program.

 

Recommendation

 

Replace the current Intercultural/International Competence requirement (3 credits) for baccalaureate degree students with the following two requirements:  United States Cultures (3 credits) and International Cultures (3 credits) as described below and as implemented according to the Principles of Implementation stated below.  Associate degree students will continue to have a three-credit requirement and may choose either a United States Cultures course or an International Cultures course.

 

United States Cultures (3 credits)

A wide variety of social, cultural, and political forces have shaped the culture and institutions of the United States.  As a result, it is important for university students to be exposed to the historical background, development, and current configurations of various groups in our pluralistic American culture.  Such exposure will promote an understanding of the many complex issues of inter-group relations and the many kinds of cultural contributions that have shaped our nation.

A course that fulfills the United States Cultures requirement must strive to increase students' understanding of contemporary United States society.  Such a course need not focus exclusively on the present and may concern a historical subject.

Courses with the United States Cultures designation will include two or more of the following components and will include those components in the graded evaluation of student performance.
 
United States Cultures courses will:

 

1.     Cultivate student knowledge of issues of social identity such as ethnicity, race, class, religion, gender, physical/mental disability, age, or sexual orientation;

 

2.     Convey to students a knowledge of different United States values, traditions, beliefs, and customs;

 

3.     Increase student knowledge of the range of United States cultural achievements and human conditions through time;

 

4.    Increase student knowledge of United States social identities not in isolation, but in relation to one another (for example, the interaction of race or gender with socioeconomic status).

 

International Cultures (3 credits)

A wide variety of social, cultural, and political forces have shaped the cultures, nations, and institutions of the modern world.  As a result, it is important for university students to be exposed to the historical backgrounds, cultural and scientific contributions, and economic, social, psychological, and political circumstances of civilizations, cultures, and nations outside of the United States, to promote understanding of the variety of world cultures.

A course that fulfills the International Cultures requirement must strive to increase student knowledge of the variety of international societies and may deal to some extent with U.S. culture in its international connections.  It need not focus exclusively on the present and may, indeed, be a historical subject.  Courses with the International Cultures designation will do two or more of the following:

1. Cultivate student knowledge of the similarities and differences among international cultures;

2. Convey to students a knowledge of other nations' cultural values, traditions, beliefs, and customs;

3.  Increase students' knowledge of the range of international cultural achievements and human conditions through time;

4.  Increase students' knowledge of nations and cultures not in isolation, but in relation to one another.

 

Principles of Implementation

 

A. These requirements--United States Cultures (3 credits) and International Cultures (3 credits)--may be fulfilled by double-counting with other General Education courses, courses in the major or minor, electives, or such approved three-credit options such as Study Abroad, internships, etc., to the extent permitted by the student’s college, major, or degree program.

 

Courses will be designated as 1) United States Cultures, 2) International Cultures, or 3) United States and International Cultures.  A student may use a course in the third category to fulfill either the United States Cultures requirement or the International Cultures requirement.  Since 6 credits are required, a single 3-credit course may not fulfill both requirements.

 

B.   The following principles will be adopted to make the approval criteria clear, the approval process as quick as possible, and the course designations readily understandable to both students and advisors.  The following criteria will be used in determining course designations:

 

(a)   The course is designed to fulfill the required objectives, as indicated in the previous descriptions.

(b)   At least one-quarter of the course is oriented toward fulfilling the objectives of the requested designation as United States Cultures, International Cultures, or United States and International Cultures.  For a course seeking both designations, each 25 percent must be satisfied for a total of at least 50 percent.

(c)   The objectives are included in the graded evaluation of student performance.

(d)   Every undergraduate course meeting these requirements will be eligible for the appropriate designation(s), regardless of course level, offering unit, or other University designations.

 

  1. Existing GI Courses:  All existing GI (Intercultural/International Competence) courses will be grandfathered and designated as filling either the United States Cultures or the International Cultures requirement (or, where appropriate, both). Responsibility for determining which of the designations that each existing GI course should receive will be delegated to the college that submitted the GI proposal for this course.

The following process will be used:  The Senate will ask each Associate Dean for Resident Instruction to send the University Curriculum Coordinator a list of those courses that qualify for the United States Cultures or the International Cultures designation.  The Associate Dean for Resident Instruction will send a request to each department or division head to determine the proper designation for each course that qualifies.  The head will send the department’s response to the Associate Dean for Resident Instruction who will convey that information to the University Curriculum Coordinator.

 

  1. Other Existing Courses:  A simplified and timely procedure will be developed for the speedy and efficient designation of additional existing courses, including courses within majors, to support the goal of the rapid integration of these requirements throughout the curriculum.  Responsibility for determining which of the designations each such course should receive will be delegated to the college that submitted the proposal to establish this course.  For offerings of the same course at multiple locations, the college offering the course will determine the designation.  For example, the designation for a faculty-taught section of English 15 at Penn State DuBois will be determined by the Commonwealth College.
     

The following process will be used:  The Senate will ask each Associate Dean for Resident Instruction to send the University Curriculum Coordinator a list of those courses that qualify for the United States Cultures or the International Cultures designation.  The Associate Dean for Resident Instruction will send a request to each department or division head to determine the proper designation for each course that qualifies.  The head will send the department’s response to the Associate Dean for Resident Instruction who will convey that information to the University Curriculum Coordinator.

 

Departments offering General Education Skills courses that are not now included in GI will be encouraged to designate a limited number of sections in which at least 25% of the material satisfies one or the other requirement.  Such sections of skills courses will be taught primarily by faculty or by specially trained instructors.  This option will be primarily useful for those locations where it may be hard to meet the requirement by way of Knowledge Domain courses. 

 

  1. One-Time Offerings:  A streamlined approval process will be developed to add the appropriate designation(s) to one-time offerings of sections of existing courses not otherwise permanently listed for United States Cultures, International Cultures, or United States and International Cultures.  Responsibility for determining which of the designations each such course should receive will be delegated to the college offering the course.

 

The following process will be used:  The Senate will ask each Associate Dean for Resident Instruction to send the University Curriculum Coordinator a list of those courses that qualify for the United States Cultures or the International Cultures designation.  The Associate Dean for Resident Instruction will send a request to each department or division head to determine the proper designation for each course that qualifies.  The head will send the department’s response to the Associate Dean for Resident Instruction who will convey that information to the University Curriculum Coordinator.

 

  1. New Courses and Course Changes:  Proposals for newly created courses, however, and for substantive course revisions will go through the regular Curricular Affairs processes.

 

  1. Designations:  Designations which are unambiguous and not easily confused with other university designations will be implemented for the United States Cultures and International Cultures requirements. 

 

  1. Multiple Bulletin Listings:  Some courses may be listed in the Bulletin in multiple versions.  For example, one version may bear the United States Cultures and/or the International Cultures designation, and another version may not--just as courses may now have a separate “W” version listed in the Bulletin.

 

The following process will be used:  The Senate will ask each Associate Dean for Resident Instruction to send the University Curriculum Coordinator a list of those courses that qualify for the United States Cultures or the International Cultures designation.  The Associate Dean for Resident Instruction will send a request to each department or division head to determine the proper designation for each course that qualifies.  The head will send the department’s response to the Associate Dean for Resident Instruction who will convey that information to the University Curriculum Coordinator.

 

  1. Active Learning Criteria:  United States Cultures and International Cultures courses that carry General Education Knowledge Domain designations will continue to meet the Active Learning criteria associated with their General Education approvals.  United States Cultures courses and International Cultures courses that are not part of the General Education Knowledge Domains will also be encouraged to include Active Learning elements.

 

  1. Additional Options:  Aside from the opportunities to fulfill the United States and International Cultures requirements that are mentioned above, other possibilities, such as clusters of courses, may be submitted to the Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs for consideration.

 

Implementation Calendar

 

These revised requirements will take effect for students entering baccalaureate degree programs at the beginning of Summer 2005.

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON CURRICULAR AFFAIRS


Christopher S. Adams

Phyllis F. Adams

Laurie Powers Breakey, Vice Chair

Douglas K. Brown

Barton W. Browning

Garry L. Burkle

Chao-Hsien Chu

Jeremy Cohen

Valerie A. Earnshaw

Roger A. Egolf

Christopher J. Falzone

Edgar I. Farmer

David J. Green

Sally A. Heffentreyer

Binh P. Le

Robert A. Novack

Mary Beth Oliver

Robert D. Ricketts

David W. Russell

Richard J. Simons, Jr.

Loanne L. Snavely

Shelley M. Stoffels, Chair

Bonj Szczygiel

Rodney L. Troester

Horst von Dorpowski

Mark L. Wardell

Matthew T. Wilson

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION


Cheryl L. Achterberg

Todd (TJ) Bednash

John P. Cancro

Caroline D. Eckhardt

Gary J. Fosmire

Cheri Gallagher

Peter D. Georgopulos

Janis E. Jacobs

Richard R. Kennedy

Nancy S. Love

Arthur C. Miller, Vice Chair

Laura L. Pauley, Chair

Dhushy Sathianathan

John L. Selzer

Patience L. Simmonds

Katie L. Slagle

Candace Spigelman

James A. Strauss

D. Joshua Troxell

John B. Urenko

Beverly J. Vandiver

Eric R. White

Gregory R. Ziegler

 

CONFERENCE COMMITTEE

Douglas K. Brown                   Laura L. Pauley

Barton W. Browning                David W. Russell

Caroline D. Eckhardt               Shelley M. Stoffels

Janis E. Jacobs                        D. Joshua Troxell

W. Terrell Jones                      Beverly J. Vandiver

John W. Moore, Chair


Appendix A

 

Below you will find a list of 100 GI courses arranged alphabetically by department that were taught at all Penn State locations during Fall 2003.  These 100 courses were the GI courses with the highest enrollments.  Departments placed a seating limit of 17,501 on these courses.  The actual enrollment was 15,107.  That left 2,484 seats open.

 

If the Senate approves the legislation calling for a revision of the GI requirement, then the appropriate department heads and deans will decide which new designation to assign to each existing course:  United States Cultures, International Cultures, or United States and International Cultures.

 

This list allows us to see some of the courses that will be available for prompt inclusion in the new United States Cultures and International Cultures categories.  This is only a partial list.  Further courses that will be added include existing GI courses not in the top 100, existing courses that do not yet carry the GI designation, and new courses yet to be developed.  

 

Top 100 GI Courses According to Enrollments

(Listed Alphabetically)

COURSE

COURSE LONG TITLE

AAA S100

Evolving Status of Blacks in the Twentieth Century:  Interdisciplinary Perspectives

AAA S110

Introduction to Contemporary Africa

AAA S145

African American Religion

AAA S146

The Life and Thought of Martin Luther King, Jr.

AAA S147

The Life and Thought of Malcolm X

AAA S202

Gender Dynamics in Africa

ADM J423

Sexual and Domestic Violence

ADM J451

Race, Crime, and Justice

ADM J453

Women and the Criminal Justice System

AM ST104

Women and the American Experience

AM ST105

American Popular Culture and Folklife

ANTH 001

Introductory Anthropology

ANTH 008

Aztecs, Mayas, and Incas

ANTH 011

Introductory North American Archaeology

ANTH 045

Cultural Anthropology

ANTH 146

North American Indians

ART H120

Asian Art and Architecture

COURSE

COURSE LONG TITLE

ART H320

Chinese Art

BB H 302

Diversity and Health

BIOL 020

Plants, Places, and People

BUS  364W

Business and Society

CAMS 012

Lands of the Bible

CAMS 025

Greek Civilization

CAMS 044

Ancient Near Eastern and Egyptian Mythology

CAMS 045

Classical Mythology

CAS  455

Gender Roles in Communication

CAS  471

Intercultural Communication Theory and Research

CMLIT002

Introduction to Western Literatures Since the Renaissance

CMLIT003

Introduction to African Literatures

CMLIT004

Introduction to Asian Literatures

CMLIT010

The Forms of World Literature:  A Global Perspective

CMLIT083S

First-Year Seminar in Comparative Literature

CMLIT100

Introduction to Comparative Literature

CMLIT101

The Theme of Identity in World Literature:  Race, Gender, and Other Issues of Diversity


COURSE

COURSE LONG TITLE

CMLIT105

The Development of Literary Humor

CMLIT106

The Arthurian Legend

CMLIT108

Myths and Mythologies

CMLIT153

International Cultures Through Literature and Film

COMM 205

Women, Minorities, and the Media

CSD  269

Deafness and Society

EDUC 315

Social and Cultural Factors in Education

ENGL 135

Alternative Voices in American Literature

ENGL 139

Black American Literature

ENGL 194

Women Writers

ENGL 235

African-American Oral Folk Tradition

ENGL 431

Black American Writers

ENGL 490

Women Writers and Their Worlds

FR   139

France and the French-speaking World

GEOG 040

World Regional Geography

GER  100

German Culture and Civilization

GER  157

Pennsylvania Germans: The Culture of the Sectarians

HD FS315

Family Development

HEBR 010

Jewish Civilization

HIST 010

World History I

HIST 011

World History II

HIST 121

History of the Holocaust 1933-1945

HIST 152

African American History

HIST 153

The Indian in North America

HIST 174

The History of Traditional East Asia

HIST 175

The History of Modern East Asia

HIST 179

Latin-American History Since 1820

HIST 191

Early African History

I B  303

International Business Operations

I B  445

Global Marketing

INART062

West African and African American Arts: from the 1960s to the present

INTST100

Introduction to International Studies

IT   130

Italian Culture and Civilization

COURSE

COURSE LONG TITLE

IT   131

Italian American Culture and Civilization

L I R136

Race, Gender, and Employment

LING 001

The Study of Language

MANGT340

Introduction to Human Resource Management

MKTG 445

Global Marketing

MRKTG470

Global Marketing

MUSIC007

Evolution of Jazz

MUSIC009

Introduction to World Musics

NURS 415

Community and Family Health Nursing--Concepts and Applications

PHIL 007

Asian Philosophy

PHIL 009

Philosophy, Race, and Diversity

POLSC123

Ethnic and Racial Politics

PSY  471

The Psychology of Gender

R P M277

Recreation for Persons with Disabilities

RL ST001

Introduction to World Religions

RL ST004

Jewish and Christian Foundations

RL ST104

Introduction to Buddhism

RL ST111

Early Judaism

RL ST140W

Religion in American Life and Thought

RL ST146

The Life and Thought of Martin Luther King, Jr.

RUS  100

Russian Culture and Civilization

RUS  110

Russian Folklore

SOC  110

Sociology of Gender

SOC  119

Race and Ethnic Relations

SPAN 131

Ibero-American Civilization

THEA 207

Gender and Theatre

THEA 208

Workshop: Theatre in Diverse Cultures

WMNST001

Introduction to Women's Studies

WMNST003

Introduction to Women, the Humanities, and the Arts

WMNST102

Women of Color: Cross-Cultural Perspective

WMNST104

Women and the American Experience

WMNST110

Sociology of Gender

WMNST194

Women Writers


Appendix IV

4-27-04


Corrected Copy

SENATE COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS

 

Revision of Senate Policy 67-00, Athletic Competition, Section 2, Eligibility of Athletes

 

(Legislative)

Implementation:  Fall Semester 2004

 

Background

 

The proposed revision to Senate Policy 67-00 has been prompted by academic changes in Penn State curricula, and changes to Big Ten Conference and NCAA legislation.  Currently, the University has specific academic guidelines that student-athletes must adhere to in order to participate in intercollegiate athletics.  These standards, determined by a student-athletes’ current semester in residence, fall into two specific areas:  Minimum Grade Point Average and Minimum Number of Credits Required.  It is believed that the current Grade Point Average requirements are crucial to facilitating a strong academic culture within the student-athlete population and within the entire University.  However, given many changes both inside and outside the University, the second area, Minimum Number of Credits Required, needs to be reviewed.

 

Rationale

 

The policy currently states the following as it relates to the Minimum Number of Credits Required (for intercollegiate athletic participation):

 

“A student-athlete shall represent the University in an intercollegiate athletic contest only if the student has acquired the designated number of credits at the beginning of each appropriate semester (in residence) as follows:”

Semesters in Residence

Minimum Number of Credits Required

2

9

3

24

4

38

5

52

6

67

7

83

8

100

9

118

 

After consulting with a variety of experts including current NCAA Faculty Athletic Representative, Dr. Scott Kretchmar, former NCAA Faculty Athletic Representative, Dr. John Coyle, and former Director of the Morgan Academic Support Center, Mrs. Diana Kenepp, it is clear why these academic guidelines were established at Penn State.  First, Penn State wanted to have academic guidelines and expectations above the mandated NCAA guidelines.  Second, Penn State wanted to have guidelines in place that would insure that student-athletes participating in intercollegiate athletics would be completing a baccalaureate degree in a reasonable time frame (4 ½ or 5 years).  Finally, Penn State wanted to insure that student-athletes, who decided to return to Penn State and participate in intercollegiate athletics in a fifth-year of competition, would be within one semester of completing their degree.

 

However, information obtained from Vice-Provost and Dean of Enrollment Management and Administration, John Romano, indicates that there has been a marked reduction in the number of credits required for a degree (Table 1) across many programs.  When the current 67-00 Policy was created, degree programs required many more credit hours for a degree; which in turn, demanded that a higher minimum number of credits required for athletic participation be established.

 

Given the many demands that required of student-athletes, 15 credits a semester would seem to be a reasonable course load.  Gary Burkle, Associate Registrar, indicates that for all of University Park students, the average number of credits taken in a given semester is between 13 and 14 credits.  Further, all students, irrespective of whether they are athletes or not, are only required to enroll for 12 credits to maintain full-time status.

 

Recently passed NCAA legislation requires student-athletes to enroll in and pass at least six credits counting towards the student-athlete’s degree each semester.  This creates issues for fifth-year student-athletes who plan to compete in their final season of eligibility.  The 118 credits required to start a fifth-year of competition can create situations where a student-athletes will have no courses, which count toward their degree, to enroll in during their last semester of competition.  Many of these student-athletes do not want to enroll in a second major or attend graduate school immediately, and therefore, a revised policy would provide flexibility and additional options.

 

Upon joining the Big Ten Conference, Penn State accepted another set of academic guidelines (in addition to Policy 67-00) for its student-athletes.  Similar to the new NCAA requirements, the Big Ten rules addressing credit minimums is very strict in that the conference requires that all credits earned must be degree countable.  Additionally, the Big Ten Conference requires that student-athletes must be able to complete their program of studies in a five-year period.  As stated earlier in this proposal, Policy 67-00 was written to insure that student-athletes graduated within five years - joining the Big Ten only reinforced this idea.

 

Recommendation

 

Given that adherence to the current policy often results in a closing down of options available to student athletes in formulating and completing their semester scheduling plans, and given that the revised set of semester by semester credit minimums are more strict than those imposed upon the general student body at the University, and given that the requirements still surpass those imposed by the NCAA, Big Ten (Table 2), the current policy should be amended to read as follows:

67-00 Athletic Competition

 

2. Eligibility of Athletes

 

2. A student-athlete shall represent the University in an intercollegiate athletic contest only if the student has acquired the designated number of credits at the end of each appropriate semester (in residence) as follows:

 

After Semester in Residence

Minimum Number of Credits Required

1

9

2

24

3

38

4

52

5

67

6

82

7

97

8

112

 

Effective Date: August 15, 2004

 

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS


Charles L. Burchard

Paul F. Clark

Timothy M. Curley

Gordon F. DeJong

Susan Delaney-Scheetz

James T. Elder, Vice-Chair

Bruce D. Hale

Elizabeth A. Hanley

John R. Hellmann

Kane M. High

Janis Jacobs

R. Scott Kretchmar

Russell Mushinsky

John S. Nichols

Gary W. Petersen

Martin T. Pietrucha, Chair

Tammy R. Rishel

John J. Romano

Stephen W. Schaeffer

Stephen M. Smith

Kenneth Swalgin

Vicky L. Triponey

Thomas C. Vary

Susan Welch

Jerry J. Wright

Edgar P. Yoder


 

Table 1. Number of Credits Required for a Degree by Number of Majors.

 

Credits Required for Degree

Fall 1998

Fall 2003

120-124

91

138

125-129

53

43

130-134

41

27

135-139

10

6

> 140

10

0

 

Table 2. Comparison of NCAA, Big Ten, and Penn State requirements.

   

 

Minimum Number of Credits Required

After Semester in Residence

NCAA

Big Ten

Penn State

1

-

-

9

2

24

24

24

3

-

-

38

4

48

51

52

5

-

-

67

6

72

78

82

7

-

-

97

8

96

105

112